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CCLS Rubrics

Page history last edited by LCI, Ltd. 11 years, 4 months ago

 

There are currently a couple dozen sites that I have tagged with CCLS (or CCSS for you non-New Yorkers) rubrics that I intend to look at more closely in the future. But in the meantime, I wanted to share a rubric that emerged from a conversation with a group of middle school special education teachers (h/t to Chatham and Wellsville CSD teachers) to help strengthen students' ability to self-assess their writing using the language of the Common Core. This is a part of a larger project and includes checklists, performance-based tasks, and other rubrics. What's compelling about this rubric to me is that it highlights the role of the learner. This isn't about generating a grade or scoring, but rather, helping students reflect on their own writing without having to wait for an adult's feedback. Questions? Tweet me or drop me an email

 

Rubric for Self-Assessing Grammar and Mechanics

 

 

My work is ready to be revised

My work is ready to be edited

My work is ready to be proofread

My work is ready to be published

L.07.01 – to what degree does the student demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing?

 

A writer can self-assess their grammar by reading their piece aloud to ensure the piece makes sense. 

I struggle to read my piece aloud. My grammar mistakes make it difficult to understand what I meant to say. I keep forgetting my point or say something different than what I wrote.

 

I need to make major changes before someone else can read it.

I can read my piece aloud but need to stop to rewrite or restate confusing words or phrases. My ideas remain pretty much unchanged as I read aloud.

 

I need to make changes before someone else can read it.

I can read smoothly through my piece without needing to correct my grammar. Words make sense and my thoughts flow from one to the other. Small errors do not interfere. 

 

I need someone else to read my piece to catch mistakes I can’t see.

I can read smoothly through my piece without needing to correct my grammar. Anyone can pick up my piece and read throughout it without a problem.

 

A copy editor would not be able to find any grammar errors in my piece.

L.07.02 – to what degree does the student demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing?

 

A writer can self-assess their spelling and capitalization by reading their piece backwards - from the end to beginning. Punctuation can be self-assessed by reading aloud and making sure your voice matches your punctuation choice (for example, do you have a period to indicate the end of a thought? Do you have commas where you paused?)

My ideas are there but spelling, punctuation, and capitalization errors make it difficult for me to understand them as I re-read. Unless I fix these errors, the reader won’t be able to understand me.

 

 

My ideas are there and spelling, punctuation, and capitalization errors slow me down as I re-read. Unless I fix these errors, the reader will struggle to understand me.

My ideas are there and are easily understood. Any spelling, punctuation, and capitalization errors are easily overlooked. Fixing the errors will polish off my writing.

My ideas are there and easily understood. I may deviate from traditional spelling, punctuation, or capitalization but I do it to help convey my ideas and can explain the reasoning for my decision.

 

Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution - ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (December, 2012) 

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