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Steps for Creating a Rubric

Page history last edited by LCI, Ltd. 10 years, 4 months ago

Sample Rubric Design Process

Two strategies for developing rubrics using the Common Core State Standards are depicted in the table below. The one on the left incorporates the use of student work, whereas the one on the right does not. In both cases, the standards quoted come from HS level CCSS.

 

RUBRICS CREATED WITH TASK, TEACHER EXPECTATIONS, COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS AND STUDENT WORK

RUBRICS CREATED WITH TASK, TEACHER EXPECTATIONS AND COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS

Step 1: Describe the task

Step 1: Describe the task

a. Describe what students will do

a. Describe what students will do

Step 2: Identify quality attributes/indicators

Step 2: Identify quality attributes/indicators

a. List the teacher expectations

a. List the teacher expectations

b. Using exemplars, identify and list other attributes that make a quality and authentic performance, process or product.

b. Identify and list other attributes that make a quality and authentic performance, process or product.

c. List the performance indicators from the appropriate level of the state standards that support or extend the task and related expectations

c. List the performance indicators from the appropriate level of the state standards that support or extend the task and related expectations

Step 3: Develop dimensions

Step 3: Develop dimensions

a. Cluster the above lists of attributes and/or indicators into possible groups or categories

a. Cluster the above lists of attributes and/or indicators into possible groups or categories

b. Label each group (dimension) with a heading.

Example: the indicators “assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text supports a claim” and “compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources” can be clustered under “Assessment of sources”

b. Label each group (dimension) with a heading.

Example: the indicators “assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text supports a claim” and “compare and contrast findings presented in a text to those from other sources” can be clustered under “Assessment of sources”

c. Write a definition for each heading in the form of a question (How well did you assess your sources?) or statement (the degree to which you assessed your sources)

c. Write a definition for each heading in the form of a question (How well did you assess your sources?) or statement (the degree to which you assessed your sources)

d. Prioritize each group in terms of importance or value or determine the order that will be most useful for your students as they work.

d. Prioritize each group in terms of importance or value or determine the order that will be most useful for your students as they work

Step 4: Describe the levels in the following order

Step 4: Describe the levels in the following order

a. Review existing student work produced for this task and sort it into stacks that share the same quality or level of performance. Identify stacks as above expectations, meeting expectations, evidencing difficulties with expectations, far below expectations.

 

b. Level 3 (created first):

Develop the 3rd level of your rubric by describing the behaviors, characteristics, or qualities that exhibit a proficient product, process or performance. The list you made in Part 2 will be the basis for the proficient level of your rubric. For example, “compare and contrast findings presented in one text to those from other sources assessing the reasoning and evidence of each source” is the descriptor for level 3.

 

Use exemplars and/or the student work that you identified as meeting expectations to help you keep wording precise and focused.

a. Level 3 (created first):

Develop the 3rd level of your rubric by describing the behaviors, characteristics, or qualities that exhibit a proficient product, process or performance. The list you made in Part 2 will be the basis for the proficient level of your rubric. For example, “compare and contrast findings presented in one text to those from other sources assessing the reasoning and evidence of each source” is the descriptor for level 3.

 

c. Level 4:

Describe the behaviors, characteristics, or qualities that exhibit achievement at the highest level. The highest level should be above the expected standard of excellence. For example, “synthesize information from a range of sources, addressing and resolving conflicting information when possible” is the descriptor of level 4.

 

Use anchors and/or the student work that you identified as above expectations to help you keep wording precise and focused.

b. Level 4:

Describe the behaviors, characteristics, or qualities that exhibit achievement at the highest level. The highest level should be above the expected standard of excellence. For example, “synthesize information from a range of sources, addressing and resolving conflicting information when possible” is the descriptor of level 4.

 

 

d. Level 1:

Write the descriptors for the lowest level of the rubric. Identify what the student has done and not just what he/she has not done. An example is: “lists information from one or more sources without assessing their credibility or validity.”

 

Use anchors and/or the student work that you identified as far below expectations to help you keep wording precise and focused.

c. Level 1:

Write the descriptors for the lowest level of the rubric. Identify what the student has done and not just what he/she has not done.

An example is: “lists information from one or more sources without assessing their credibility or validity.”

 

e. Level 2:

Write the descriptors for the second level of the rubric. Identify the nature of errors students make at this level. Some examples include: “compares two or more sources attending to surface features instead of assessing their validity” or “makes judgments about the validity or credibility of several sources but without fully substantiating these.”

 

Use anchors and/or the student work that you identified as evidencing difficulties with expectations to help you keep wording precise and focused.

d. Level 2:

Write the descriptors for the second level of the rubric. Identify the nature of errors students make at this level. Some examples include: “compares two or more sources attending to surface features instead of assessing their validity” or “makes judgments about the validity or credibility of several sources but without fully substantiating these.”

 

Step 5: Use the rubric

Step 5: Use the rubric

a. Share the rubric with students, using sample work or excerpts from exemplars to help to illustrate quality and possibly the Checklist for Quality Rubrics.

a. Share the rubric with students, engaging in conversations around clarity, possibly using the Checklist for Quality Rubrics as a guide.

 

b. Revise based on confusions or questions.

b. Revise based on confusions or questions.

c. Have students use the rubric while developing their performance, product or process.

c. Have students use the rubric while developing their performance, product or process.

d. Incorporate the rubric into multiple formative assessment moments, allowing rubric-based feedback to lead to time to revise and improve work based on the criteria presented.

d. Incorporate the rubric into multiple formative assessment moments, allowing rubric-based feedback to lead to time to revise and improve work based on the criteria presented.

e. Use the rubric as a summative assessment tool.

e. Use the rubric as a summative assessment tool.

Step 6: Revise the rubric

Step 6: Revise the rubric

a. Use student work generated from the task to revise rubric for clarity and precision.

a. Use student work generated from the task to revise rubric for clarity and precision.

 

 

Copyright © 2011, Learner-Centered Initiatives, Ltd. www.lciltd.org


 

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